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20121202
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at what's at stake with marcia coyle of "the national law journal." >> brown: hari sreenivasan reports on the threat to the shellfish industry from coast to coast, as ocean temperatures rise and the waters are more acidic. >> this is a very dramatic change that has not been seen in the worlds oceans for more than 50 million years. >> woodruff: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> brown: and gwen ifill sits down with michael beschloss, whose recent foray into the twitter-verse has opened up a new way to view history in the digital age. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: more people found work in november and more people stopped looking for work. as a result, the number of new jobs came in better than expected today and the rate of unemployment was the lowest s
and ushered in a new law making marijuana legal. it raises questions about the drug war more widely is being waged. it is the subject of a new documentary, "breaking the taboo," which criticizes the narcotics trade. we sit down with those who produced the film. >> the amount of people consuming drugs worldwide is growing dramatically. the number of people going to prison is growing dramatically. and countries that are present about drugs are suffering. and the people in particular are suffering. countries like portugal and spain, which are treating it as a health issue rather than a criminal issue are getting on top of the problem. >> are you advocating the legalization of drugs? >> globally, we have tried different approaches. the legalization of canvas or the regulation of canada's, would like to see -- seecannabis or the regulationcannabis, would like to see country try that. we would like to see the regulation. correct here in the united states today, possessing small amounts of marijuana becomes legal in washington state. do you expect federal law to change? >> we will see. this is a lo
of marijuana, by adults, is legal. the new law was approved by voters last month, and took effect at midnight. in seattle, about 100 people marked the occasion by smoking joints beneath the city's iconic space needle. technically, doing that in public remains against the law. marijuana is still illegal under federal law. but the justice department has not said if it will try to block the washington state law or a similar statute in colorado. same-sex marriage also became legal in washington state today, and in maryland. gay and lesbian couples in both states began picking up marriage licenses. those in washington state have to wait three days to be married. same-sex weddings in maryland will begin on january first. maine will legalize the practice on december 29. the three states are the first to approve same-sex marriage by popular vote. in economic news, new jobless claims fell sharply last week, after a temporary spike in the wake of hurricane sandy. and on wall street, stocks managed modest gains today. the dow jones industrial average added 39 points to close at 1,374. the nasdaq rose 15
kate's condition. the government confirmed it will be moving quickly to pass a law ensuring that if their first child is a girl, she will definitely be third in line to the throne. she will not be passed over by any younger brother. >> the old-fashioned rules where only a boy could become the king and his oldest sister would not be allowed to, the rules will be swept aside and that is change, and updating of the rules that many people would welcome. >> alan farthing was spotted. leading the treatment. >> it is one of the worst things i have ever gone through, bar none. it puts your body through minutes you never thought you have. i felt there were times when i felt like my body had been poisoned. >> for william but most particularly for kate, these are testing days. they know there will have the support of their families, of each other, and of millions of people who they have never met. bbc news at the king edward the seventh hospital. >> the duchess of cambridge spending a second night in hospital for morning sickness. it was famously called the fast as talk of jobs in the
to hear a challenge to californias gay marriage law. you can find that in our essential reads section at pbs.org/washingtonweek. keep up with daily developments with me over at the pbs newshour, and well see you again next week on washington week. good night. and happy hanukkah, everybody. >> funding for "washington week" is provided by -- >> this rock has never stood still. since 1875 we've been there for our clients through good times and bad. when their needs changed we were there to meet them. through the years from insurance to investment management from real estate to retirement solutions, we've developed new ideas for the financial challenges ahead. this rock has never stood still, and that's one thing that will never -- never change. prudential. corporate funding for washington >> week is provided by -- norfolk southern, boeing. additional funding for "washington week" is provided by the annenberg foundation, the corporation for public broadcasting and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >>> every single bite needed to be -- >> twinkies in th
't read your email unless regulated by law. there are 33 instances of this in the constitution. it would be, of course, the parliament that writes the law. there's a lot of concern that isn't a longstanding clear contract between the people in the government but really another way for the brotherhood to expand its power grab here. >> brown: nancy yousef of mcclatchy in cairo, thanks so much. >> ifill: we'll continue our conversation series in the days to come. we get a very different take on this. paul krug man is a nobel prize winning economist at princeton university and a columnist for the "new york times." he joins us now. ers kin bowles may be one of the people you have written about in the past who you called deficit... who were touting a phantom menace known as the fiscal cliff. am i right about that? >> fiscal cliff is not a phantom menace. the deficit right now is. the notion that something terrible will happen if we don't deal with the deficit right away. the fiscal cliff is a very different story. that's about reducing the deficit too fast. >> ifill: you call it an austerity b
counterpart tom daschle. the two did something called compromise. a concept that facilitates law foreign in today's congress. watch. >> i had a red phone where when i picked up that phone, it rang only one place. on tom daschle's desk. and when he picked it up, i knew i was talking to tom daschle. not his staff. not my staff. sometimes he and i lead when our conferences were not ready to move. i remember i called one time i called him, i stepped out from a conference meeting and tom you know we need to do this, i'm having problem and he said i am too, let's go, i will see you on the floor. we went up on the floor of the senate, we called the bill up and passed it by sundown. you got to do that every now and then even though you might catch a little flash from those in your conference. it is called leadership, anderson. >> just to clarify, a red phone was on republican leader trent lott's desk and a red phone was on leader tom daschle desk. when the red phone rang on daschle's desk, he knew it was lott. and when lot's phone rang, he knew it was daschle. both. and why can't both chame beve
to be the winner. >> like money -- >> rose: significant. >> so significant. because there was a pareto -- brother-in-law in the tribal areas. i think one's going to lead you to the family member. he got killed in a drone strike a couple within six months when this whole thing happened. up until then they thought maybe he's going to be -- >> money for walk-ins family and the courier. i'm sure there were many others. >> rose: they were dedicated. i want to look at some clips here so we can identify the quality of the action here. this is the scene in which the c it a operative maya played by the extraordinary jessica chastain. briefs the troops on two narratives about bin laden. >> you'll notice the panels similar to what we use on the b2. they've been muffled with decibel killers -- but it can hyde what do we need these for, it's certainly anti-air -- >> do you want to brief him? >> there are two narratives about the location of osama bin laden. the one you're familiar with is ubl is hiding in a cave in the tribal areas surrounded by a large contingent of loyal fighters. that narrative is pre 911 ... un
warned the syrian government not to use chemical weapons on its people. online, an update to a law in saudi arabia renews a debate about male guardianship. hari sreenivasan has more. >> sreenivasan: now whenever a saudi woman leaves the country, her husband or father receives a text message. the recent changes to the long- held system of male guardianship sparked outrage on twitter recently. i spoke to a journalist in saudi arabia who says the practice reinforces male control. our conversation is in the rundown. today's science roundup features dragonflies, or as one science writer calls them "the bengal tigers of the microworld." find the story on our home page. how can you secure a larger social security payment from an ex-spouse? the answer is in this week's installment of "ask larry." all that and more is on our web site, newshour.pbs.org. gwen? >> ifill: and that's the newshour for tonight. on tuesday, we'll look at turkey's request for nato to deploy patriot missiles along its border with syria. i'm gwen ifill. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. we'll see you online, and again
contracts "require strict compliance with state and federal laws and regulations, including worker safety," and that "worker safety has always been a hallmark of at&t." guilford'siancée, bridget pierce, thinks that no one ultimately took responsibility for guilford's safety. >> nut. >> n-u-t. >> i believe that everybody that is involved should be held accountable. at&t, the contractors, general dynamics and the smaller companies that are subcontracted out. everybody in this process should be held accountable for and have to pay fines and have regulations that they all have to live up to. >> smith: after guilford died, the foreman for all around towers disappeared and was never questioned by osha. the company quickly went out of business, but two of its owners, who declined interview requests, then started another company that continues to do work in the industry. that doesn't surprise those who study subcontracting. >> the problem of focusing the enforcement attention at the bottom, at the small subcontractor, is a little bit like the old game of whac-a-mole. you can enforce your osha st
a that there are the law of unintended consequences is always at work in these situations. >> rose: i have heard you say two things. one is that you begin to worry that your concern about the welfare of the men and women in harm's way, you might have too for lack of a better word, had a stronger place in your decision al structural than it ought to be, am i right about that? >> i became to worry i had become too protective of them. >> rose: secondly you seemed to be saying, i began to worry that we didn't know what would be the consequences and that worried you too. and in some sense of how things could get out of control and that it became -- am i real ng you right on that? >> absolutely. >> rose: so those are the two things when weighing the factors to step down that had weight on the decision to step down now? >> when we look at history for a second -- >> i will give you a concrete example. i opposed the intervention in libya. this is not a vital, this is not of vital national interest, and we are already in two wars, in fact, in the situation room i would say can i just finish the two wars i am alre
most of which at some point in time is going to become law. and the longer we put this off, the deeper the hole gets, so we're trying to focus on how do we get this done now-- >> woodruff: let me ask you about part of your plan. part of it would means test social security, medicare benefits. in order, the benefits would go down for those at the higher income levels. we had the economist paul krugman on the "newshour" last night who said that, you know, not only do the polls show many american oppose, this but he said the benefit you get, the money that would be raised from doing that is really not enough to overcome the pain that he said it would cause lower and middle-income americans. >> well, first of all, it would cause no pain to lower and middle-income citizens because they wouldn't be affected. and i agree, it's only one of the things that needs to occur. it's a small part. there are many manager transformative things that need to happen in social security and medicare and my bill outlines both transformative things to really make them solvent. there's a $27 trillion unfund lieb
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)

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